Recent Comments

Feb 17 2018 Galen Handy 7:45 AM

I can confirm that the car is entirely consistent with a model D Detroit, and not with a Baker. All enclosed Detroits have the doors hinged at the front. Most, if not all, Bakers hinged their doors at the rear, as was traditional with many Ohio coach builders.
The Detroit Electric auctioned by Bonham was a 1910 model D, serial number 1886, which was shipped from the Anderson factory February 17, 1910.
Henry Ford bought Clara a new Detroit Electric every other year from 1908 through 1914.  Baker made some front axles for Ford in 1908, but the family did not use his electrics (at least not after 1907.)
The silver mine was known as the “Comstock Load” not the “Comstock Lodge”

From Mystery Foto #45 Solved (Maybe?): Virginia Fair Vanderbilt in her 1910 Detroit Electric

Feb 14 2018 Bob McDonald 12:31 PM

My uncle Gene Martin is in one of the photos sitting next to Austie in the 1911 Mercer.

From Henry Austin Clark Jr. and his 1911 Mercer 35R Raceabout

Feb 14 2018 mark schaier 8:09 AM

Strange, two different hubcap designs on the Tin Goose shown at different times? WHY?

 

 

 

 

From Mystery Foto #6 Solved: The Tucker Tin Goose at a 1947 Exhibit

Feb 12 2018 Howard Kroplick 11:24 PM

From the Tucker ‘48 Automobiles Facebook Page
https://www.facebook.com/groups/tucker48/

Michael Howe Given the extended lower bumper and colored grill, the Tin Goose?

John Dore yep, Tin Goose - based on the position of the rear door handles too

Robert A. Walko Production models had suicide doors. So, yeah, Tin Goose.

Alex Kidwell Tin goose

Dan Maciejewski The car aside, Tin Goose was the only Tucker displayed like this, a press display if you will

Ken Northcraft: Tucker Tin Goose

Dave Wardamasky nicer wheel covers than what it now wears

Jimmy Mayhugh Tin goose. It has no turn signals in the front as well

Robert Jones Yeah, Tin Goose

From Mystery Foto #6 Solved: The Tucker Tin Goose at a 1947 Exhibit

Feb 12 2018 frank femenias 9:41 PM

Wild guess, this is Howard’s Tucker, #1044 in original green

From Mystery Foto #6 Solved: The Tucker Tin Goose at a 1947 Exhibit

Feb 12 2018 Tim Ivers 5:56 PM

Looks like the prototype Tucker ‘Tin Goose’ built in 1947 and debuted June 19th that year
at the Tucker plant, the former WWII aircraft building in Chicago.
Partly financed by sales of “Tucker Luggage”.

From Mystery Foto #6 Solved: The Tucker Tin Goose at a 1947 Exhibit

Feb 12 2018 S. Berliner, III 2:01 PM

Mirrors?  Sez you.  I think you’ll find that they align with the external louvres and, if the glass weren’t now silvered, would work exactly as I clearly recall being shown when the car first turned up at the Museum.  The louvres weren’t mere “deco"ration.  Regardless, I’d give a pretty penny for a time machine so I could step through that door at the left in the side view!  Sam, III

From Direct from Brazil: Three Photos of the 1937 Chrysler's Chrysler at the LeBaron Factory

Feb 12 2018 Tom Gibson 12:43 PM

Howard,

It was great seeing you and the family at the AACA Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, and congratulations on your National Award for Mrs. Chrysler’s Chrysler. Loved seeing it at Hershey last October!

TG
________________________________________________________
Howard Kroplick

Great to see you in Philly too!

From Direct from Brazil: Three Photos of the 1937 Chrysler's Chrysler at the LeBaron Factory

Feb 12 2018 Tom Gibson 12:40 PM

Sam III, the LeBaron was outside in the Eagle’s Nest courtyard for no more than a few weeks the summer that I took those photos, according to the museum’s director. It then went back indoors in the musty garage where it deteriorated even more until its ultimate rescue.

From Direct from Brazil: Three Photos of the 1937 Chrysler's Chrysler at the LeBaron Factory

Feb 12 2018 Jim Ryan 8:38 AM

Photo was taken at the Tucker Unveiling Event, Chicago, Illinois June 19, 1947

From Mystery Foto #6 Solved: The Tucker Tin Goose at a 1947 Exhibit

Feb 12 2018 Jim Ryan 8:33 AM

the nickname for the women showing the Tucker at this exhibit were TUCKERETTS

From Mystery Foto #6 Solved: The Tucker Tin Goose at a 1947 Exhibit

Feb 12 2018 Jim Ryan 8:31 AM

The Luggage was sold by The Tucker corporation accessory program. The Luggage was Tucker Luggage.

From Mystery Foto #6 Solved: The Tucker Tin Goose at a 1947 Exhibit

Feb 11 2018 Art Kleiner 9:06 PM

Identify this specific Tucker. Provide a rationale. Hint: This Tucker has several design features seen only on this automobile. 
Prototype named the Tin Goose.

When was this photo taken?  1947

Where was this photo taken (currently unknown)?

What was the nickname for the women showing the Tucker at this exhibit?  Hmm- how the Tuckerettes?

What was the brand name for the Tucker luggage?  Indestructo

From Mystery Foto #6 Solved: The Tucker Tin Goose at a 1947 Exhibit

Feb 11 2018 Steve Lucas 6:46 PM

That is the Tucker prototype car #1000 also known as the “Tin Goose”. It was the only one made without suicide doors in the rear. Photo may have been taken on June 19, 1947 at its public debut at the Tucker factory on Cicero Avenue in Chicago, IL. I think the women were called Tuckerettes. The luggage was manufactured by INDESTRUCTO.

From Mystery Foto #6 Solved: The Tucker Tin Goose at a 1947 Exhibit

Feb 11 2018 Steven Vilardi 6:10 PM

The door handles have to be the giveaway. It must be the Tin Goose Tucker 48 #1001 prototype. The location does not appear to be the White Castle in Lynbrook.

From Mystery Foto #6 Solved: The Tucker Tin Goose at a 1947 Exhibit

Feb 11 2018 S. Berliner, III 1:55 PM

I don’t recall the car being outside; it was inside the garage when I first saw it (and thus all the more gigantic).  Howard, what can you tell us about the metal vs. fabric chauffeur’s compartment tops, please?  Also, I still insist that the three-quarter ports were originally open, although clear-glassed behind the louvres, so that Della could peek out, unseen (I SAW them); mirrors in there were a later modification.  You might still be able to find door-hinge-pin-mounted rear-view mirrors; they were still available in left-right pairs some 20-30 years back.  Sam, III
_____________________________________________

Howard Kroplick

Sam III, Chrysler’s Chrysler came with a metal roof and a canvass roof over the driver’s compartment. The internal portholes were merely vanity mirrors.

Howard I

From Direct from Brazil: Three Photos of the 1937 Chrysler's Chrysler at the LeBaron Factory

Feb 11 2018 Dick Gorman 12:27 PM

Mystery friday Foto # 6… The Tucker in this photo is #1037. Not the Tin Goose. As per a page ion The Tucker Auto club site. Photo taken on June 19, 1947 at Tucker plant in Chicago. Name of women showing the Tucker at this exhibit… Tuckerettes. I just made that up. Don’t really know answer. The luggage brand was Tucker.

From Mystery Foto #6 Solved: The Tucker Tin Goose at a 1947 Exhibit

Feb 11 2018 Jim Ryan 8:30 AM

This Tucker is the Tin Goose,  #0000 a prototype. This Tucker did not have suicide doors. The rear doors hinges are attached to the B Pillar.

From Mystery Foto #6 Solved: The Tucker Tin Goose at a 1947 Exhibit

Feb 11 2018 mark schaier 5:26 AM

The factory photo’s shows no wheel trim rings that was added later, along with a center front bumper guard, was removed in recent time, the original side view mirror that was mounted on top front door hinge, nice, that was replace with some aftermarket side view mirror on the door frame.

From Direct from Brazil: Three Photos of the 1937 Chrysler's Chrysler at the LeBaron Factory

Feb 11 2018 mark schaier 5:06 AM

The car is the original Tin Goose prototype, the rear doors opens forward, the hubcap of different designs than the later ones, the front bumper grill painted black. The other things unknown to me?

From Mystery Foto #6 Solved: The Tucker Tin Goose at a 1947 Exhibit

Page 410 of 452 pages ‹ First  < 408 409 410 411 412 >  Last ›