Recent Comments

Nov 17 2019 S. Berliner, III 12:20 PM

These threads seem to be coming thick and fast!  Love it!  Here I go again - see my LIMP Page 3 <http://sbiii.com/limpkwy3.html> for some 24 Sep 1999 pix of this area.  Art K., you’re doing a fab. job; thanks muchly.  Sam, III

From Kleiner's Kolumn: Revisiting the Transformation of the Motor Parkway into Salisbury Park Drive

Nov 17 2019 S. Berliner, III 11:51 AM

Another rambling - re Frank F.‘s OCR bridge pix - I lived in Mineola for many years and, back then, potatoes kept sprouting out of my lawn.  The whole area was once dead flat, the vast Mott potato farms.  So just think of what a massive operation it was to raise the grade of E-W OCR and lower the N-S RoW for the LIMP (mostly by hand, at that)!  Sam, III

From Mystery Friday Foto #45 Still Open for Discussion: A Motor Parkway Bridge Built on a Curve

Nov 17 2019 Jonathan B. Richards II 11:41 AM

Magnificent presentation of early automotive racing history. Thank you Mr. Kroplick for your continued pursuit of this now century old information. Marvelous and very scholarly work. Preservation of this early industrial history is doubly important in this age of revisionists. Your factual and non-editorial approach keeps proper perspective as we view hard core pragmatists , adventurers and yes , even dare devils , seeking to further personal and business interests—all the while enjoying the thrill and challenge of unbridled speed. Gentlemen start your engines!

From Hemmings Classic Car: The Vanderbilt Cup- America's first internationally recognized road-race

Nov 17 2019 Robert Allen 7:49 AM

Seeing the locust posts still standing reminds me of what my father, born in 1915, says they used to tell him: the problem with locust posts is you can’t tell when they’re worn out.  So what you want to do is put a brick on top of the post; that way you know when the brick wears out the post must be worn out.
He also said his uncles told him how in the late 1800’s, they got a gig supplying black locust turning blanks to the NY City Police Department.  But the PD stopped buying them because they were cracking too many heads.

From Kleiner's Kolumn: Revisiting the Transformation of the Motor Parkway into Salisbury Park Drive

Nov 17 2019 S. Berliner, III 12:28 AM

I’m not second guessing anyone this time, just curious.  Reading Al’s comments, I imagine not even he actually knows, so we are ALL guessing!  How are to find out (if ever)?  Sam. III

From Mystery Friday Foto #45 Still Open for Discussion: A Motor Parkway Bridge Built on a Curve

Nov 16 2019 frank femenias 11:20 PM

These 1909 photos of the Old Country Road highway bridge in Mineola/Garden City by surveyor Clinton Robertson demonstrate the difference between north and south views. The top photo of the bridge is looking north and well lit. The bottom photo is looking south and darker. These were taken at the same time, sometime in the afternoon.

From Mystery Friday Foto #45 Still Open for Discussion: A Motor Parkway Bridge Built on a Curve

Nov 16 2019 Paul Randazzo 10:41 PM

Wow a blast from the past. That’s my old neighborhood (Queens Village).  We used to ride our bikes on that network of VMP through Alley Pond and Cunningham parks onto streets over the Clearview Expy. onto VMP onto streets and end up at the Worlds Fair grounds back in the late 60’s (I was like 11-12 years old). I remember the old entrance and exit onto the Grand Central Parkway from Springfield Blvd. and the bridal path when we used to visit my relatives in Brooklyn (oh the Interborough).  Thanks guys!!

From Sam Berliner III: A 1970 Walking Tour of the Motor Parkway in Queens

Nov 16 2019 Brian D McCarthy 9:22 PM

Like the fact that these could switch back to bicycle mode if there was engine troubles or if the gas tank was empty :~ )

From Motorcycles of the Vanderbilt Cup Races Updated: 4/28/2016

Nov 16 2019 frank femenias 1:50 PM

All great guesses, but Al and Brian’s stands out furthest in my opinion. Clinton Ave parkway bridge (1909) in Garden City looking NW, with its 50ft RoW being fenced in. The flat roadway in the photo appears about 16ft. width, and less than 22ft. As Al noted, the only LIMP section to get the 22ft roadway this early was between Merrick Rd in Salisbury and Round Swamp Rd in Bethpage. The structures in the distance on left could belong to Mineola Fairgrounds (1866-1950). They had eight buildings standing inline on the south side by Washington Ave and 11 Street. As Brian suggests, the object in the distance at right could be a smoke plume from a westbound steam engine on the LIRR mainline, measured approx 0.8 miles from this bridge, a distance close to what’s seen in the photo. Vanderbilt Court roadway (lodge entrance) would’ve been off this photo to the left, after measuring the distance 100 ft between it and the LIMP, center to center.
The Westbury Ave parkway bridge (1909) with its 16ft width also an excellent guess, but the south view against the sun I believe, would’ve back-lit all the workers, making them appear darker in the photo. The only shadows are under the hats. There are no photos of this bridge’s railings but I suspect they too were low, as its sister Mineola RR bridge just to the south.
The Bloomingdale Rd highway bridge (1908) with water tower is a great guess too, but the high railings don’t match. I guess these were placed to help keep farm equipment from spilling onto the roadway below.
That’s my two cents. Feel free to comment, I’m sure I’ve missed several things on this tricky mystery  

From Mystery Friday Foto #45 Still Open for Discussion: A Motor Parkway Bridge Built on a Curve

Nov 16 2019 Corey Victoria Geske 11:06 AM

Howard, here’s the working link for the PLI Newsletter that connects, so you can use it in your blog (the one there now isn’t connecting). Its
https://preservationlongisland.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/PN-Fall-2017-for-website-upload.pdf

From The Residence of the Starter of Five Vanderbilt Cup Races Rediscovered in Smithtown

Nov 16 2019 Corey Victoria Geske 11:01 AM

Thank you, Howard, for all your help in the successful effort to place The Residence of the Starter of Five Vanderbilt Cup Races, Fred J. Wagner, on the National Register of Historic Places! The New York State Review Board for Historic Preservation unanimously approved his home for the State Register on June 13, amazingly, the 150th Anniversary of Fred’s birth in 1869. Designed by Gustav Stickley, Fred’s home qualified under three criteria, notably Criterion B, as nationally significant “for its association with the life of Frederick J. Wagner of national and international auto racing fame.” Officially cited as the ‘Frederick and Annie Wagner Residence’ (Annie was Nancy’s nickname), both the Stickley rectory and adjacent church (originally built as St. Patrick’s R.C. Church) belonging to the Byzantine Catholic Church of the Resurrection in Smithtown, are now listed on the National Register. Many thanks, Howard, for your blog picturing your great collection of materials about Fred, all cited throughout the Register Nomination I prepared. Thank you for helping to preserve Long Island’s historic treasures in Smithtown!  P.S. As you suggested, I’ve bought a checkered flag. To borrow a line from Field of Dreams, if I wave it, will the auto shows come?

From The Residence of the Starter of Five Vanderbilt Cup Races Rediscovered in Smithtown

Nov 15 2019 S. Berliner, III 6:30 PM

As long as this came alive again, I took more time with the second blow-up; the inscription reads:  “- COUPE VANDERBILT - 1904 - / Le Match - GABRIEL - LONG ISLAND RAILROAD {sic} - / au passage á Niveau d’Hicksville” [at (the) crossing in (the) neighborhood of Hicksville].  Sam, le Troisième

From Mystery Foto #8 Partially Solved:A Humidor Vanderbilia from the Simeone Foundation Automotive Museum

Nov 15 2019 S. Berliner, III 6:08 PM

Since we don’t know the bridge, we don’t know the year, by we DO know that the entire Hempstead Plains section was built between 1908 and 1911, so no possible 1929 LIACC or its hangars, nor Camp Mills.  I have good recipes for crow (and have eaten my share) but I can all but guarantee this is a PARKWAY bridge!  In my not-at-all humble opinion, some of you are wasting your time looking for matches to highway bridges.  Selah!  I have spoken (yes, I live dangerously).  :·)  Also, look at the precision with which the left-hand ditch was cut; amazing - and unlikely for just a country road.  C’mon, guys.  Fu’ther, what IS that thing on the right horizon, just above the fence crossbucks?  I spotted it instantly as Westbury Station but the present two-story building wasn’t built until 1914.  ???  Sam, III

From Mystery Friday Foto #45 Still Open for Discussion: A Motor Parkway Bridge Built on a Curve

Nov 15 2019 Howard Kroplick 12:26 AM

Tom, thanks so much for providing this information!

From Mystery Foto #8 Partially Solved:A Humidor Vanderbilia from the Simeone Foundation Automotive Museum

Nov 14 2019 Brian D McCarthy 8:19 PM

Possibility of Bloomingdale Rd - maybe not so unlikely that the photographer was positioned south of this Hwy Bridge during construction. The boundary fencing on both sides of the Bloomingdale south of the LIMP could have extended to the ROW fencing east & west. Being that the parkway built the bridge, doing SOME road paving on both sides seems like a good idea, but certainly not the ENTIRE roadway.

From Mystery Friday Foto #45 Still Open for Discussion: A Motor Parkway Bridge Built on a Curve

Nov 14 2019 Art Kleiner 8:11 PM

Thanks Brian - makes sense since so much of what I’m looking at (and the surveys in Howard’s possession) use the term “station”.  This info. will help identify some locations and structures I’ve had a hard time determining.

From Kleiner's Kolumn: Revisiting the Transformation of the Motor Parkway into Salisbury Park Drive

Nov 14 2019 Brian D McCarthy 5:11 PM

Although blurry, this may be in the early stages of the bridge.

From Garden City Archives: The "Snake Turn" of the 1908-1910 Courses of the Vanderbilt Cup Races

Nov 14 2019 Tom Brierley 4:23 PM

Fred, 

I just came upon your Vanderbilia photo, with the question about your silver box.

This was cigar box that was created in the 1990s by the London silversmith, Glynn Lambert.  It is silver plated box with a mahogany interior.  The image that Glynn etched into the top is his interpretation of the 1904 Vanderbilt Cup pochoir art that Montaut displayed in his book, “10 Ans de Courses 1897-1907”.

As far as I know, only 2 of these boxes were created.  I own the second.

From Mystery Foto #8 Partially Solved:A Humidor Vanderbilia from the Simeone Foundation Automotive Museum

Nov 14 2019 Brian D McCarthy 3:06 PM

Interesting info Art, thank you. ‘Station’ is used in the plans here, and I thought it was strictly a LIMP construction term. Defined as a unit of measurement between points in surveying.

From Kleiner's Kolumn: Revisiting the Transformation of the Motor Parkway into Salisbury Park Drive

Nov 14 2019 Art Kleiner 12:52 PM

Mike - yes, always fun to be near what I am researching.  Brings it a bit closer to home.  Very interesting what was there before - makes you wonder what changes will take place over the next 100 years or so.

Al - thanks.  Bob Reed according to some searches on google was a firefighter with the East Meadow Fire Department who the day after fighting a lumber yard fire died of a heart attack.  As you know there is a fire house on that triangle: very appropriate as a memorial.

From Kleiner's Kolumn: Revisiting the Transformation of the Motor Parkway into Salisbury Park Drive

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