Mar 26 2019

VanderbiltCupRaces.com Exclusive: High-Resolution Photos of the 1906 Vanderbilt Cup Race


While looking through her great-grandmother's box of family memorabilia, Barbara Z. discovered seven Old Westbury photos of the 1906 Vanderbilt Cup Race. These photos, likely taken by Nathan Lazarnick or photographers from Spooner & Wells, are in perfect condition and will be presented in a new  VanderbiltCupRaces.com exclusive series.

The first photo in the series is the #3 Mercedes driven by Camille Jenatzy at the Hairpin Tun on Wheatley Road in Old Westbury.

Enjoy,

Howard Kroplick




Comments

Mar 27 2019 Howard Kroplick 9:48 PM

Here is an image of driver Camille Jenatzy.

You can now download images with your VanderbiltCupRaces.com comments.

image
Mar 28 2019 frank femenias 12:09 AM

Long lost treasures of historic photos! This is truly an amazing find. Hats off to Barbara Z. and Howard for taking the time to share these gems. Anticipating more will surface in the near future. Keeping my fingers crossed.

Mar 31 2019 Bruce Adams 7:01 AM

Great Photos.
Was that a blown head gasket shot?

Mar 31 2019 Gary 8:42 AM

Was that a blown head gasket shot?

Bruce, that’s a premonition of the Chrysler influence one-hundred years back to the future.

Mar 31 2019 S. Berliner, III 4:54 PM

Bruce and Gary - looks more like a burning clutch facing but it’s far more likely to be just plain old 1906 engine exhaust as Le Diable Rouge (“The Red Devil”) accelerated coming out of the curve.  Sam, III

Mar 31 2019 S. Berliner, III 5:20 PM

Further to my comment re smoke, take a look at HK’s Sep 2005 “CAR COMING” poster (and the cars haven’t even started yet!).  Sam, III

Mar 31 2019 Walt Gosden 5:54 PM

Of all the period photographs I have seen by Nathan Lazernick or Spooner & Wells all of them had the photographers named rubber stamped on the back , usually with a small mention that credit should be given to them if used , since most were done for use in the newspapers of that era.

Apr 01 2019 frank femenias 2:07 AM

I’m not sure but it appears all or most exhaust pipes on these early autos were on the port side (mechanician side) keeping smoke away from the driver. The Mercedes likely executing the turn while downshifting creating the excess smoke. I dont see any distress in the photo, they’re succeeding the curve except the mechanician possibly adding more smoke from his cigarette. The cigarette could be photo distortion

Jenatzy’s death was a surprise to me years back being unrelated to racing. I doubt I’ll ever forget the irresponsibility involved.

Apr 01 2019 Rich 5:58 PM

What’s protruding from the front of the vehicle?  Looks like a poll supporting something…

Apr 01 2019 S. Berliner, III 11:59 PM

Rich - happy April 1st!  Seriously, though, that’s not a pole protruding forward; it’s an illusion caused by the camera angle exactly matching that of the front fenders and what you see is the bead of the two fenders and the transverse rod (or pole, if you wish) between them, connecting them and running across in front of the radiator.  Sam, III

Apr 02 2019 S. Berliner, III 12:08 AM

Rich - P. S. - You can see the fenders and rod better in Howard’s Jun 17 2013
Mystery Foto: #20 Solved: Grave‚Äôs Garage in Mineola- Headquarters for the 1908 #3 Mercedes - in the last two pix.  Sam, III

Apr 02 2019 Roger 11:16 AM

And the fenders were typically canvas

Apr 02 2019 S. Berliner, III 10:53 PM

“Typically canvas”?  I don’t think so.  I’ve seen an awful lot of antique cars and rarely ever saw canvas fenders, even on racers.  Anyone?  Sam, III

Leave a Comment