Nov 23 2011

A Vanderbilt Cup Race Physician and the Jericho Friends Meeting House


It was a pleasure to be part of the outstanding team that presented to the Town of Oyster Bay Board to support the landmark designation of the historic Maine Maid Inn. The Jericho building was located on the courses for the 1905, 1906 and 1908 Vanderbilt Cup Races and is adjacent to the Friends Meeting House.



 

  Following the Town Meeting, Tom Abbe, clerk of the Jericho Preparative Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends, and I discussed the Vanderbilt Cup Race physician's armband discovered in 2000 in the Malcolm House, located directly across from the Meeting House on Old Jericho Turnpike.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                  

 

   I gave Tom a copy of the 1909 Vanderbilt Cup Race Program Guide which listed Dr. W.J. Malcolm as part of the "Surgical Staff".  A logical conclusion was that this armband belonged to Dr. Malcolm.

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 This week, Tom invited my wife Roz and I to tour the 1788 Jericho Meeting House and the adjoining "burying ground".  A bonus to this wonderful opportunity was to potentially find additional information about Dr. Malcolm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. W. J. Malcolm worshipped here over 100 years ago.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Meeting House organ.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 1793 Quaker School where Elias Hicks taught, now the caretaker's cottage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just prior to our tour, Jericho High School students were working on a project concerning the Jericho Quakers.

 

 

 

 

 

 Within the burying ground  are the gravestones for James Malcolm and his son Dr. Malcolm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Adding to my research, Dr. W. J. Malcolm was Dr. William Jackson Malcolm (1867-1950), the son of James and Phebe Malcolm. Dr. Malcolm was a staff physician for several Vanderbilt Cup Races, likely including the 1905, 1906 and 1908 races which passed directly in front of the Malcolm House. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In a day of Thanksgiving, thank again Tom Abbe for your very informative and enlightening tour!


Links to related posts on VanderbiltCupRaces.com and the Internet:

SyossetJericho Tribune "Venditto Proposes Purchase of Maine Maid Inn"
"Listeners at the Oyster Bay Town Board meeting for granting landmark status to the Maine Maid Inn in Jericho were surprised and delighted (shown by sudden applause) as Supervisor John Venditto proposed the town might purchase the historic building....." 

Preserving the Maine Maid Inn and the Vanderbilt Cup Races
 

The Action in Jericho- 1908 Vanderbilt Cup Race

The Vanderbilt Cup Race Courses (1904-1910)
 

Index: Archives on VanderbiltCupRaces.com

Archives: Monthly Highlights (2008-2011)

 



Comments

Nov 27 2011 Tom Abbe 9:43 AM

Howard is not only researching & writing about our history and heritage. He is showing us how we are a part of it and how we all belong to history. Long Island history, American history, world history. It was absolutely my pleasure to be a part of this work. Thanks Howard!

Nov 27 2011 Jan vanderBaan 10:35 AM

I was raised in the Quaker church in Westbury.The pictures brought back memories of cold winter Sundays in the old meeting house. Thanks for the memories.

Nov 28 2011 Jeff Norton 11:49 AM

Hi Howard, I drove your ALCO in England in 1988 when Ed Hubbard owned it . I was working at Ivan Dutton’s Bugatti shop. The Alco was at Ed’s museum on the Fruit Farm, right next to Stanly Mann’s Bentley shop.
The LIOCC held a reenactment lunch and tour of the Vanderbuilt Cup race at the Maim Maid Inn about 1988. Old 16 was there with Jerry Helk. Austin Clark asked him to bring the car. Austin owned the car years before and sold it to Peter Helk.
One evening ,30 years ago, I was told to stop by tap room on the corner of 106 and 25A to see the pictures of the Vanderbuilt Cup race routes.They were hung hi around the perimeter of the room so I was looking up at them when an elderly lady,very well dressed, said to me ,“what are you looking at”? So I turned to explain to her about the race routes. She said,“oh, I remember that. My father took me to them when I was a little girl.” I must have talked with her for an hour in awe.  There’s more to that wonderful visit of chance. Jeff

Leave a Comment